The Floating Palace


Udaipur is often called the Venice of the the east. I haven't visited Venice, but I'd still prefer it to be called the Udaipur of the west! I'll let the pictures of the Jag Niwas Palace at Lake Pichola do the rest of the talking: More photo stories from Udaipur This is post #28 in… Continue reading The Floating Palace

The haveli next door


Lal ghat is perhaps the most tourist-y area of Udaipur, filled with havelis-turned hotels. Most of the hotels and cafes in the areas now boast of roof-top dining, and we explored as many as we could. One particular one, though, stood out. Jaiwana haveli was highly rated on Trip Advisor, and we headed straight there… Continue reading The haveli next door

Puppets


One of the exhibits at Bagore ki haveli, is a hall filled with puppets—of colourful Rajasthani men, women and animals. I'll let the puppets introduce themselves: We are only puppets, our strings are being pulled by unknown forces. ― Georg Büchner “Sometimes when I'm writing, I wonder if the words have a mind of their… Continue reading Puppets

Pots of fire


"I don't think we'll be able to catch the dance show. They'll probably cancel it with this much of rain." Sitting on a bench around a tree in the courtyard of the City Palace, two umbrellas and the narrow roof above us couldn't prevent us from getting wet. Earlier that day we had visited Bagore… Continue reading Pots of fire

Sunset at Monsoon Palace


As promised yesterday, here's the view we saw atop the Monsoon Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan. Like I said, neither my words, nor my pictures could do justice to what we saw. This must suffice for now. Photo taken with a Moto G3, edited Befunky. Click/tap to enter my Flickr Photostream This is post #5 in this… Continue reading Sunset at Monsoon Palace

Myths about Monsoon Palace


Researching for our trip to Udaipur, we had heard and read about the amazing views of the Aravalli hills from the Monsoon Palace, especially at sunset. The Monsoon Palace was constructed specifically for the purposes of observing the monsoon clouds—and what better time to visit the Palace than in the monsoon! It had poured heavily… Continue reading Myths about Monsoon Palace

Marooned in Palace(s)


Travelling during the Indian monsoon is tricky. Apart from the dangers of landslides and floods, there is the danger of being trapped inside a cold hotel when it is pouring outside. Fortunately, we are not crazy enough to venture towards perilous terrains or poorly administered areas. Our first monsoon vacation was to Gwalior last year,… Continue reading Marooned in Palace(s)

To reveal, or not to reveal?


A prominent feature of Rajasthani architecture are the windows with their characteristic floral silhouette. When visiting monuments in the region, it is hard to resist the temptation of framing the magnificent views with the window. Ah, what a feeling it must have been, living in those palaces! Alas, for women, not a very good one.… Continue reading To reveal, or not to reveal?

Welcome view


I wanted to write about the stereotypical portrayal of Rajasthan - a traditionally attired instrumentalist, strumming his Ravanhatta and playing Raag Maand and perhaps the most popular, and misinterpreted Rajasthani folk song "Kesariya Balam". But I'll shut up this one time, and sit with the Rajput royals and look out for the monsoon clouds atop… Continue reading Welcome view

The House by the lake


Khudala House - a beautiful homsetay in Udaipur